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Is 'translay' an ancient alternative to suicide?

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An overview of suicide and the ancient 'translay' concept

(3rd edition - December 2006) by A.O. Kime
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At one time or another, we’ve all probably considered committing suicide... although perhaps not always seriously, or for very long, but for whatever reason an escape was sought the idea likely cropped up as an option. In a sense, just knowing one could commit suicide has a soothing effect. It is to know a way exists to end the torment… whereas if there was no escape, assuredly it would make the situation seem even worse. Without the option of suicide, a violent rampage could be the next step or perhaps insanity.

There are probably thousands of reasons why suicide might cross someone’s mind but it shouldn’t be necessary to list them… imagining a few is enough. Even if it seemed the only answer at the time, it has social implications and nearly always affects the surviving relatives in a negative way. Not so much for being suddenly absent because anyone can die unexpectedly, but rather what suicide is often taken to mean. For most of society, it’s a copout; but for relatives, especially one’s children, it seems more a statement of having little interest in their lives and welfare.

Further, the common view is that suicide suggests a character flaw existed, a weakness, being someone unwilling to tough-it-out like most people. But none of that is always true; it could be justified, understandable, a matter of honor and suicide may, in some cases, prove to be in the best interests of their loved ones. It could be proof their loved ones were considered after all.

There could also be times it is a prudent choice. In situations when the prospects for a tolerable life seem impossible, and with solid evidence to believe that, then suicide might be understandable. However, this ‘solid evidence’ is often not solid but merely believed to be in order to dispense with the trouble… in effect, an excuse for taking the easy way out. Conversely, severe and unrelenting pain can be seen as a justifiable reason or if a horrible death otherwise looms, by a cruel enemy for example.

At other times however, such as the gut-wrenching pain from a divorce or the death of a loved one, and while the pain is often intense initially, it almost always subsides to a manageable level or effectively disappears. It is doubtful anyone views suicide for these reasons as justifiable. Weaknesses are always held in low regard.

Suicide missions

There is another reason why one might feel justified to commit suicide and that is over political reasons… as a matter of justice for example. Publicly staged suicides are a desperate attempt to attract attention to the situation and influence public opinion. Suicide bombers have become commonplace lately and, perhaps to some of their countrymen and relatives, justifiable. Besides individuals acting on their own, there are always soldiers willing to volunteer for suicide missions as well. For that matter, even taking unnecessary risks shows a disregard for life, seemingly a secret desire to die which wouldn’t be so revealing as an outright suicide.

Whatever the reasons one might feel justified to commit suicide, the act is their final one and for that very reason the notion is often abandoned. It is to imagine no longer existing and that is unsettling. It seems only when the problems at hand supersedes one’s concern about the meaning of death is when suicide is most likely. In other words, that threshold must be met but most often it isn’t. It could also be argued that courage is involved either way; that it takes some to commit suicide but also to prevail despite the pain, suffering and outlook. While it is almost always foolish to commit suicide, sometimes it might be foolish to prevail. In short, the matter of suicide has many faces.

Another reason for suicide is financial… and even that has more than one face. It’s either done over long-term poverty or huge lump-sum losses. In the latter, often it isn’t so much the money but rather for losing one’s pride and social standing. As often the case, one’s social standing in society is necessary for success… and once lost, very hard to recover. That may explain why some people move away to start over... a new environment can be a solution. Still, a financial failure - that which they staked their reputation on - is tough to cope with. Perhaps it involved huge losses to investors… or worse, investors who were friends and family who lost unforgivable amounts. Guilt over squandering the family fortune or their children’s inheritance may factor in.

Poverty, especially grinding poverty, is another reason for suicide and appears true worldwide. While grinding poverty in America is rare, poverty is nonetheless common although not to the extremes as in other countries. Unless it is grinding poverty, most people can contend with the milder forms, especially if they haven’t known much better. The problem lies with older people (retirees) who were once middle-class but later forced into an impoverished lifestyle because of medical costs. After decades of living fairly comfortable, poverty is a hard pill to swallow.

Perhaps there are times suicide can be justified as a matter of honor. A fog shrouds that reason however because honor is so closely related to pride. In fact, the two are so closely connected, they are generally inseparable. But if they can be separated, honor, by itself, is more institutionally aligned. In most cases, acts of honor are to protect the integrity of an institution, its commissions and offices. Whether or not acts of honor should include suicide, it probably depends.

Other examples surely exist but perhaps the focus should be on the act of suicide itself, specifically the final thoughts before carrying out the act. Weighing the pros and cons in every conceivable way surely transpired, also to consider what, if anything, death entails. It is to also wonder how suicide might affect the chance for immortality (with any faith in the concept). Most religions believe suicide is a sin but for someone that went ahead anyway, exasperation obviously prevailed over that worry.

While pride is considered one of the seven deadly sins for spiritual reasons, it can also have deadly consequences on earth... if it leads to suicide. The loss of pride is a misguided reason for suicide and why having too much can be dangerous.

A third option?

Interestingly, it may be common to wonder whether another (third) option is available as some Catholics once did or still believe. In other words, an option other than suicide or sticking it out until our eventual death. Perhaps under extreme stress is when many might wonder or when one gets to an advanced age… or if a slow death is expected near-term (illness). Yet, these thoughts may occur even while in good health.

If a third option exists, what might that be? Of course, one would like to envision it being a dignified way to exit this world. After all, there isn’t anything dignified about rotting away in a coffin, a dog peeing on one's ashes or for that matter, committing suicide.

If such a third option didn’t exist, nothing is lost by looking. But if it did exist and we didn't bother looking… that might mean something perhaps as to our prospects for immorality. Of course, without knowing anything about the hereafter, nothing at all, anything is possible. Who knows... it could mean that if you exercised that option, you’d be reincarnated as a chicken.

The problem is… where does one look? Well, there seems evidence that our subconscious mind has the ability to tap these secrets and once our subconscious mind deems us worthy these answers will become known. This process is often referred to as 'tapping into divine intelligence'... also known as the Divine Intellect. It seems apparent... there is no other way to ascertain spiritual matters. If it pertains to the ethereal, human logic is useless.

Logic might say, however, that in order to exit using the third option might mean only the spirit exits but not the body (instead of full 'ascension'). But since it would be hard to imagine a body surviving without a soul (spirit), then the body would die. If that is the case, then it wouldn't be much different than dying the old-fashioned way. That is logic speaking however and cannot be trusted... not when it comes to spiritual matters.

One reason for desiring complete ascension might be that after years of dedicated service, one feels an obligation to their body. If possible, they might like to declare their body and spirit as a single unit. After all, isn’t that how we identify ourselves… dimples, beauty or baldness being as much ‘us’ as our intellect, charm and wit?

That’s the way it should work, and preferable, both 'translayed' (to wherever) and, in effect, disappearing from earth. It should satisfy our desire for a dignified exit. The concept is not new however; the word ‘translay’ is a derivative of ‘translate’ and one (Catholic) meaning is ‘to convey to heaven or to a nontemporal condition without death’. However, it is uncertain whether it remains a Catholic belief, there seems no modern reference to it. In fact, ‘translay’ is rarely found in any dictionary and, like most old unused terms, may be destined to disappear. Yet, for the very reason it has ancient roots, it should remain.

If translay was possible though, logic would still demand answers to a few questions. Would the same (old) body be made young again? Would the human body be suitable for the destination? In exasperation - but not enough to commit suicide over - one should conclude it is impossible to figure it out in a logical manner; there are simply too many unknowns. Actually, we don’t have a single clue from which to work. So that means going back to relying on our subconscious mind, that it would, when it could, tell us what to do… providing we have proven ourselves worthy and asked for and demonstrated a strong enough desire for immortality.

Do I really think this could work? Well, I haven’t proven it yet, I’m still here.

A.O. Kime

Matrix of Mnemosyne... the place of smoke signals from the spirit world

Last modified: 10/25/13